Shipley to Jobs: "Don't be evil Steve."

Will Shipley: "But when you sue someone for doing something you do yourself, you become one of the bad guys. Can you name a company you admire that spends its time enforcing patents, instead of innovating? Remember the pirate flag you flew over Apple's headquarters when you were building the Mac? Is Apple part of the Navy now?"

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Jackson Fish Market ships a Mac app

Jackson Fish Market: "Today we're taking the software created expressly for Jenny's wedding and shipping it to the rest of the world. Thrilled For You(tm) - Wedding Video Guestbook is a modern take on the traditional guestbook. Instead of signing a physical book, guests walk up to a kiosk running the Thrilled for You software, and record a video congratulations to the happy couple." - Pretty sweet. They just keep coming up with great little niche ideas. This one combines web and client side, sort of. When you order the software online it comes customized for the couple! Very nice.

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Tinkering

Mark Pilgrim: "Now, I am aware that you will be able to develop your own programs for the iPad, the same way you can develop for the iPhone today. Anyone can develop! All you need is a Mac, XCode, an iPhone 'simulator,' and $99 for an auto-expiring developer certificate. The 'developer certificate' is really a cryptographic key that (temporarily) allows you (slightly) elevated access to... your own computer. And that's fine - or at least workable - for the developers of today, because they already know that they're developers. But the developers of tomorrow don't know it yet. And without the freedom to tinker, some of them never will." - CAUTION: Mark's pretty free with the F-bomb, but the article is worth a read. The thing that really caught my eye, and my full attention, was one of Marks own comments in the comments section, it reads...

People haven't figured it out yet, but Mac OS X is on its last legs. By 2015, Apple will make appliances and developer add-ons. Not general purpose computing devices.

WOW, WHAT A BOLD STATEMENT! He might be right.

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Omni Group to embrace iPad

Omni Group Blog [via @danielpunkass]: "Remember how Macintosh was intended to be the computer 'for the rest of us'? That's what we feel Apple's iPad is: the best computing device for most of the things people use computers for. (Or, as Apple puts it, 'the best way to experience the web, email, and photos.') It's the computer people can sit down and start using immediately, without training, whether they're 2 or 92." - That is a huge commitment from one of the leading independent Mac developers on the planet! WOW!

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Hockenberry on iPad

Craig Hockenberry: "What I find most interesting is the inclusion of the iWork applications. I suspect that we'll all benefit from working in Pages, Numbers and Keynote without the distractions of the web, Twitter or chat. And in the long run, we'll prefer it." - Short, but sweet, observation from a man that has embraced both the Mac and the iPhone as developer and user.

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Sounds good to me

Matt Gemmell: "Ship a mac software product. Being a self-employed contractor is wonderful compared to being an employee, but being a software vendor has always been the goal. Three years from now I'd like to be self-sufficient with my own software, and the first step is to release a 1.0 product." - Matt has contributed some really great code to the Mac community. In fact his Open Source contributions inspired me to write some small, free, source code and give it to the Mac community.

Good luck Matt, we'll be looking for some cool stuff to come out of Instinctive Code.

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MarsEdit 2.4 hits the streets!

Daniel Jalkut: "MarsEdit 2.4 is available today and features a few ... cookies ... that you might enjoy. In particular, this release fixes bugs, fine-tunes a lot of behaviors that have been bugging me for ages, and takes support for the increasingly popular SquareSpace to a higher level." - Got it, using it to publish this post.

My favorite change...

"Post editor windows now automatically remember size and screen position"

YES! That was my idea. Smile, life is good! (Well... yes and no. I asked for it, like I'm sure a BUNCH of other folks did. Thanks Daniel!)

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Great Mac Software Companies

Old School Happy Mac.I was asked recently "If you could work for any Mac software development company, who would it be?"

Well, that's a really tough question. Here's a list of companies I have a ton of respect for. Some are small, mom and pop type shops, others are computing giants.

Here they are, in no particular order...There ya go! A list of great Mac development shops.

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Gruber on OS's

Ack!John Gruber: "Hardware and software both matter, and Apple's history shows that there's a good argument to be made for developing integrated hardware and software. But if you asked me which matters more, I wouldn't hesitate to say software. All things considered I'd much prefer a PC running Mac OS X to a Mac running Windows." - Very interesting. There was a time, not so long ago, when you could essentially buy a "PC" running Mac OS, but Steve Jobs killed that off when he returned. Much to the benefit of Apple. It is kind of weird to see a Mac die hard make a statement like that.

I'd still like to see the Mac OS X UI and services on top of Microsoft's NT Kernel, which has a bad reputation because of decisions made to support legacy behaviors. Anyway, the NT Kernel is a very good OS Kernel. It would be interesting to see other UI looks on top of it, and yes, that is possible.

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Shipping a 1.0 Mac App

Brent Simmons: "The idea behind the lecture was to talk about what makes a great Mac app. I took that as an excuse to talk about everything from work habits to UI to marketing. In other words, I threw in just about everything I know - which, it turns out, only takes about an hour to deliver. :)" - A whole lot of this is common sense, or knowledge you've already gained, if you've worked in the development world, but it is definitely worth revisiting because it's just too darned easy to forget. As developers it's easy to get caught up in adding one more thing to the mix, which can kill your 1.0 launch.

Great stuff, go take a look.

Thanks Brent!

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Seasonal Look

Rob's 2009 Jack-O-LanternDan Wood's Mac Indie Marketing: "The idea was to get as many indie developers to insert a bit of code, and some artwork, into their application, and have it released before Halloween. Then, simultaneously, Snow Leopard users would notice that a lot of their apps - at least those that were from participating indie companies - had special Halloween icons." - I love this idea, and would participate no questions asked, if I had a Mac Application. It should be no surprise I'd participate, just look how my header graphic changes month by month. Not to mention how much I LOVE HALLOWEEN! Great stuff.

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Your mileage may vary

PCR: "One of the things that people say an awful lot about the Apple Mac is that the OS is fantastic, that it's very graphical and easy to use. What we've tried to do with Windows 7 - whether it's traditional format or in a touch format - is create a Mac look and feel in terms of graphics. We've significantly improved the graphical user interface, but it's built on that very stable core Vista technology, which is far more stable than the current Mac platform, for instance." - I will always claim the Kernel of Windows is solid, I have for years, and I honestly believe it. Is it more stable than the Mac? I do doubt that.

I do find it interesting they point out they're trying to make the experience more Mac like. That can't hurt them. The Mac is still my favorite platform, with Windows holding at second place.

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One Finger Discount

Macworld: "OFD is open to any Mac developer; it's being organized by Daniel Jalkut of Red Sweater Software, maker of MarsEdit, FastScripts, and other apps. Jalkut says any developer is invited to participate, and so far more than 25 have signed up. You can now get some great apps like NetworkLocation, Today, Linkinus, and more, all at 20 percent off their original price. Shoppers simply need to use the coupon code "OneFingerDiscount" where applicable." - As of this post the number of companies participating in One Finger Discount is up to 84. Many companies have more than one application to offer, in fact it looks like most of them have more than one application. Go check it out, you might find a great application you can't live without, and you can get it at 20% off.

Also, the MacHeist folks have a great "nanoBundle" for FREE.

It's a great time to go get some software. What are you waiting for, go, now!

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Ruby on the Mac

Mac RubyMacRuby: "The new MacRuby 0.5 runtime is built upon LLVM, a compiler infrastructure also sponsored by Apple. Thanks to LLVM, MacRuby is able to transform the Ruby abstract syntax tree (AST) from the parser directly into highly optimized machine code. MacRuby supports both Just in Time (JIT) and Ahead of Time (AOT) compilation. The JIT mode will compile down the code at runtime, and the AOT mode will allow you to save on disk the compilation result. AOT compilation makes MacRuby a true Ruby compiler." - Hmmm, how long until we have full support in XCode for building compiled Ruby? Then, that begs the question, how long before we see native compilation of Ruby for the iPhone?

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Love for XCode

Fiery Robot!: "I think the true turning point started at around Xcode 3.0. Xcode is now quite simply the best IDE I've ever used. Most all of my complaints have been solved over time, and admittedly I've figured out a few things along the way that made me finally get how it all works. I thought I'd point out a few of the things that made me realize that Xcode rocks. If you're an Xcode aficionado, I'm sure you'll already know these." - The XCode team proves time and again you can create an excellent IDE on top of a UNIX underpinning. Something the Linux guys still haven't quite figured out, mind you they're getting better, but they're still stuck in 1970.

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Giving up on the iPhone?

Mike Ash: "What about my part? That part is pretty simple: I have abandoned the platform. Apple's nonsense is just too much for me. There's no joy in iPhone development, and an enormous amount of frustration. It's much more fun, not to mention profitable, to take whatever effort I would spend on iPhone development and spend it on Mac development instead." - While I'm not ready to abandon the platform I can certainly understand why Mike would abandon iPhone development. I myself like developing for the iPhone but would love to have the time to write a full fledged Mac application. I have many ideas, but they're much larger than the applications I can build for the iPhone/iPod Touch, thus, I keep working on the phone. Besides, it really is quite fun.

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Mini on The Company Meeting

Mini-Microsoft: "Did he talk about how we're losing the edge on client development for Windows and how it's all a confused multi-SDK technology mess centered around everything being .NET based?" - Interesting take. When your own devs say your SDK offerings are a mess, well, that's a problem. As for .NET, it makes developing applications a whole heckuva lot easier. The runtime plus framework are brilliant; pick your favorite language and get busy, C#, VB.Net, Iron Ruby, Iron Python, [insert your favorite here.] Some would say "Hey, that's too confusing." Not really. Everything being equal from the runtime and frameworks perspective is really nice. They have great tools; UI creation is way easier in Windows than on the Mac, at least it is for me.

All that said, I'd rather spend my days writing Mac, or iPhone, software and beat my head against the Interface Builder wall than spend another day writing Windows applications.

Maybe someday I'll have that opportunity. For now, Windows, and to a lesser degree Linux, pays the bills. It's strange. Not that long ago I'd have considered working for Microsoft again, maybe. Now, now I don't think I'd consider it, unless it was on a pure Mac, or iPhone, application.

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The First Mac Virus

MSNBC: "He and at least one other person who clicked on the links were infected by what security experts call the first-ever virus for Mac OS X, the operating system that has shipped with every Mac sold since 2001 and has survived virtually unscathed from the onslaught of malware unleashed on the Internet in recent years." - Popularity seems to breed this sort of behavior. Windows was tremendously popular when the script kiddies started their attacks. I'm sure we'll see a few more of these, and if Linux ever gains in desktop popularity, I'm sure we'll see one there as well.

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Finding and fixing iPhone/Mac memory leaks

Ref CountMobile Orchard: "Some memory leaks are easy to see by looking at your code. Some are much more difficult. This is where Instruments comes in. Instruments has a 'Leaks' tool that will tell you exactly where you're leaking memory so that you can get in there and fix it!" - These are the types of tools every developer should learn. Hard as we try to write clean code we will, on occasion, forget to release a reference to an object and you get the dreaded memory leak. I must admit the Cocoa reference counting mechanism is a bit odd to an "old-school" Windows/COM developer, but I've learned to deal with the oddness.

Oh, there is a great tutorial for Windows COM guys to explore if they're coming over to Objective-C/Cocoa to help with the ref counting mechanism.

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Mac Development Job

jobs.joelonsoftware.com: "We are looking for a software engineer who has a passion for creating innovative high quality software using the latest tools and technologies. You must be a self starter who loves solving problems in a logical self-disciplined manner. We are looking for someone who will fit well with our development team and remain courteous and friendly with both staff and customers at all times." - I also love the the following bullet points...


  • Want to work with the latest tools and a 30 inch screen?

  • Want to work for a company where innovation and software development is taken seriously?

  • Want flexible working hours and no silly dress code?

  • Want a career where what you achieve really matters?

  • Are you a clever problem solver with an enthusiastic and positive attitude?

  • Are you a self starter and still able to work in a team?

  • Can you get things done?

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OmniGraffle + FastScripts + User generated script == goodness

I've been working on a web page trying to finish up some last minute touches and I needed a Web 2.0 starburst icon. I tried using one that was auto generated by a website, but that didn't really work out liked I'd planned, so I started looking for alternative solutions.

My first attempt was to fire up Acorn, great application, and edit the one I had. In the end I wasn't pleased with the results, due to my lack of skills with an otherwise fine piece of software.

Next I thought, I know I can do this in Visio in about two minutes, but being lazy like I am, decided against it.

Thought number three was the winner. Since I could do this in Visio I'd probably be able to bang it out in OmniGraffle, right? Well, not so fast. My Visio prowess doesn't translate to OmniGraffle. Hmmm....

Enter a Google search for "star shapes for omnigraffle", which produced a link to a script! Ah-ha!

I downloaded Peter McMasters Star Script, created a new folder in my FastScripts Scripts Folder, called OmniGraffle strangely enough, and dropped Star.scpt in place.

Rob's cheezy Web 2.0 Price StarburstHere's where it gets scary. I switched back over to OmniGraffle, selected the FastScripts menu, located Star, and clicked...

It worked as advertised! Woo-hoo!

After I had the shape I was looking for I added a shadow, changed the fill, inserted some text, exported as .PNG, and did a bit of touchup in Acorn, and I had what I was after. A nice cheezy Web 2.0 Starburst!

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9 meet X

Ridiculous Fish: "Mac OS 9 and NEXTSTEP were like two icy comets wandering aimlessly in space. Neither was really going anywhere in particular. And then, BANG! They collide, stick wetly together, spinning wildly! Thus was born Mac OS X - or so the legend goes." - Ahhh, the joys of bringing two complex systems together. Go give it a read, it's quite interesting.

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What's up with NetNewsWire?

Brent Simmons: "Here's the scoop: both versions are in extremely active development. I'm currently working on NetNewsWire 3.2 and 4.0 for Mac and NetNewsWire 2.0 for iPhone." - You can catch Brent at WWDC this week.

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The price of complexity

John Nack: "In the meantime, I'm seeing quite a few requests for things that Photoshop already does. On one hand I'm always happy to tell people that they can get what they want right now--no waiting, no fee. On the other, it's a bit of a bummer that people don't find features, much less answers, on their own (and we're talking about people savvy enough to find this blog)." - This is a case of a complex application accidentally hiding features. What are you going to do, Photoshop has been around since the dawn of time, it's the granddaddy of granddaddy's, and the user base is gigantor, so it's very difficult to remove features.

I wonder if Adobe has statistics on the most used features? It would be interesting to see a new application that does that subset of functionality, with a nice shiny new user interface. Then again, maybe applications like Acorn already do that?

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Wow, what if?

Panic - Extras: "So that's what that never-happened early meeting was going to be about. Since we never met up because we were tangled with AOL, Apple turned to their next choice, SoundJam, and the rest was, well, history. Another one of those amazing "life junctions" you'll always wonder about - what if we had made iTunes? Would we be happy? Would we be having as much fun? Would we be, er, rich?" - Wow, what a great story. Cabel is a great writer and this story of Apple crushing another little guy is fantastic. Fortunately that's just the beginning of the story for Panic.

If you need some great Mac software Panic is holding a two day sale, May 27-May 29. Coda, Transmit, and the Apple Design Award winner, Unison, are all half-price.

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Posted by Rob at 9:01 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Delphi on Mac OS X?

Allen Bauer: "I guess the proverbial cat is now out of the bag. As was shown in the Delphi/C++Builder roadmap at Delphi Live!, Project X has been under way for a while now. So now you know some of the reason why things have been rather quiet here since I could not really talk about what I'm working on. The good news is that we now have a returning top-shelf engineer working on the compiler. This person was heavily involved with the original Delphi on Linux project, so there is a lot of institutional knowledge that he's able to bring to the table." - I have a lurking interest in Delphi. The guys at Embarcadero, formerly CodeGear, formerly Borland, create great IDE's and developer tools. Here's hoping the embrace the Macintosh way and make it impossible for someone to tell an Objective-C/Cocoa application from a Delphi Mac OS X application.

The good thing is it opens the doors to more developers, the bad thing is is opens the doors to more developers. If developers coming from Windows bring all their Windows baggage along with them we'll get some pretty crummy Mac applications. If they embrace what the Mac development community has know all along they should do just fine.

What is it Mac developers do differently? They create elegant, useful, stable, simple, to-the-point, software. You see it time and again on the Macintosh and I've come to appreciate it. The application I use to post to this weblog is a prime example, MarsEdit is something I use everyday, and it fits all those qualities I've listed above. Most Windows applications have noisy UI's, just look at Microsoft Word, and you'll see what I'm talking about.

So, Embarcadero, please, please pay attention to the toolbox and make sure everything you do looks like belongs on the Macintosh!

Thanks

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XCode tip-o-the-day

I've lived in Visual Studio since before it was a 1.0 product, yes, that's a very long time. Since coming to the Mac I've been spending more and more time inside XCode, very nice IDE by the way. The only downside is my fingers are trained to do Visual Studio keyboard shortcuts.

Well today one such key combination actually paid off.

If you do Alt+Shift+Mouse Down+Drag XCode column selects! Two thumbs way up guys! I don't know about you but I use that feature all the time!

Thanks XCode, you just saved me a bunch of time.

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Mac Tablet?

9 to 5 Mac: "MacFormat's 3D artist came up with these mockups and some additional specs. Will the Mac Tablet look anything like this?" - While I doubt Apple would call it a 'Mac Tablet', you get the idea. In this case it's essentially a gigantor iPod Touch. It looks nice, but I'm fairly certain Apple would do it one better.

NetBook fanatics, if something like this wouldn't please your fancy, well, what would? Yea, I know, it's not going to be $250.00 and have a free OS. Oh well, there are plenty of us who'd happily own one.

If they did do a form factor like this, what OS would it use, that's an important question to answer. I'd hope for the full blown OS X.

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MarsEdit Mobile?

I think Red Sweater is up to something, something good.

Based on recent Tweets and Tumblr posts I believe we'll be receiving a present sometime down the road. MarsEdit for the iPhone maybe?

Here's hoping.

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Bootstraping iPhone Development

Craig Hockenberry: "There's no two ways about it. If you're going to develop iPhone applications, you're going to do it on a Mac. The whole toolchain is Mac-only: you can't do it in Visual Studio or Eclipse or anything else that runs on Windows" - More great advice. The idea of purchasing a Mac Mini is a great idea, if I do say so myself. It will get you on the road to developing and keep the costs down.

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MarsEdit 2.3

MarsEdit by Red Sweater SoftwareDaniel Jalkut: "It feels great to finally have an official release out there that supports Tumblr. I would like to thank Marco Arment for his patience in working with me to improve the Tumblr API, so that it will work better with MarsEdit. There are still areas where we can improve the integration on both sides of equation, but I think this release represents a great start." - If you have a Tumblr account, and you're a Mac fanatic, MarsEdit is a fantastic weblog editor. I manage my main weblog, which is Blogger based, a test weblog which is WordPress based, a Windows Live Spaces weblog, and finally a Tumblr weblog. MarsEdit works as advertised with every one of them.

Congratulations on another great release Daniel.

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Lowest common denominator

Wired: "Sepulveda's comment is focused on what sets webOS apart from other mobile environments: It only requires programmers to know JavaScript and CSS, which are simpler and easier to learn than other mobile programming languages. That's in contrast to iPhone's Objective C based Software Developers Kit (SDK) or Android's Java based tools." - There you go. Everybody can now be a developer. I can imagine the Dancing Hamsters application for the Pre. Wink, wink. I'd rather learn Objective-C, but I have a definite Mac lean these days. They're playing to the web designer, not developers, which will open the doors to a lot of folks that otherwise wouldn't be able to develop. You can create web apps for the iPhone but the serious applications are written in Objective/Cocoa, why's that?

I hope this works for Palm, I really do. It's a huge risk. But as we all know, with huge risk comes huge reward, if you hit the mark.

BTW, have you, as a traditional developer, ever had to work with CSS? It's harder to learn than a new development language, like C++, or Ruby, or Python, or Objective-C. It's really quite strange to work with. I think the place to be is at Palm, as a developer on the OS, that would be fun!

Oh, and it'll support Flash.

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Posted by Rob at 7:26 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

MarsEdit Feature Request

Dear Daniel,

I'm a very satisfied user of MarsEdit, I love it, it makes my day to day posting quite easy and automated. Now, I'm new to the Mac, so please forgive my naivete if what I'd like to see added to MarsEdit already exists and I just haven't discovered it yet.

I worked on a Windows product called Visio for 10-years. Visio was completely scriptable via OLE-Automation. One of the coolest things about the model was the ability to hookup code that could be notified when an event took place; like the position of a shape changing for instance. Very cool, and very handy to third party developers that wanted to create their own custom solutions on top of Visio.

Now, I don't want to create a custom application on top of MarsEdit, but I'd like to write some scripts to help automate some things I'd like to do with each and every new post. I'd like to be notified when I publish, period. If that notification could include some data that told me if it was a new post or a republished post that would be extremely cool, along with the post URL and maybe a few other data points, not sure what those would be right now. :-)

I'd like to receive the "PostPost", or "PostPublish", event so I could generate a small URL using TinyURL, and publish the resulting URL to Twitter in a standard format, something like...

Weblog Post, Title: TinyURL

That's it! I'd imagine MarsEdit is most of the way there, I know you can script it with AppleScript, maybe I just need some lessons?

Thanks Daniel,
Rob

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Posted by Rob at 6:43 PM | 2 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Switching

MacWorld: "In the past year, running Mac OS X or Linux as your default OS has been made easier by the capability to run Windows in a virtual machine, giving you access to both Windows-only applications and Web sites that rely on Microsoft's Internet Explorer-only ActiveX technology. But in a business environment, switching to a Mac or Linux PC may not be quite as easy." - I've been running exclusively on a Mac for quite a while now. I use VMWare as my Windows development environment host and it's mostly worked for me. I'm sold on Mac now. It would be so hard to go back to a PC with Windows as a daily driver, but I supposed I could do it. I work with Linux as well but I'm not a very proficient Linux guy, that's ok, we have Linux gear heads all over the place. But I digress.

For me the choice is now clear, it's Mac.

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Netbooks?

There are a lot of folks talking about Netbooks. Netbooks this, netbooks that. My question is this, is a Netbook defined by its size, is it about cost, or is it a combination of both.

The reason I ask is because along with all the hype surrounding Netbooks there's a group of people that want one from Apple. So, given Apple doesn't create junk with an OS on it (have you every used a Dell laptop? Junk.), would a small laptop from Apple be considered a Netbook if it was over $1,000.00? The current low-end Macbook sells for $1,300.00, and it's a 13-inch device.

So, if you could buy a 9-inch Apple Macbook for $1000.00, would you buy one, or is it all about the price?

Apple, it's time to redefine the Netbook, in your terms. I want a BMW, not a Yugo. Thank you.

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Posted by Rob at 8:28 AM | 4 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Simple Database creation

A little company called Fileability may have found a nice little niche for Mac productivity. The product is called XBase. It's a simple to use database creation application. It allows you create forms and push data collected through those forms to a database. Very nice, and simple!

Here's a thought for you, but it probably goes against the iPhone developer rules. Build a version that creates iPhone data collection applications. That could prove VERY useful in the real world.

Hmmmm, that's not a bad idea at all! You'd need to actually generate code that could be compiled as a native iPhone app so it wouldn't break the rules. If you had a library of data collection patterns, for UI and databases, your database application could generate code, tie it to the library, and then build the application for the iPhone. I know, overly simplistic in thought, but I think doable.

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Gifts for the beginning Mac developer

The Unofficial Apple Weblog: "Whether you've just started writing your first lines of code or you've just moved over to the Mac/iPhone platform as a developer, this guide is sure to please." - Looks like a great list to me.

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Question for Mac developers

So, is there any way to make XCode not default to K&R style bracing. It's just plain ugly, and quite honestly, I can't believe people still use it. When I got my first professional C job way back we didn't use it then, but it seems to have holdouts in the hacker world, namely the Unix style derivatives.

Anywho, I digress, is there a way to make the braces lineup by default? Thanks!

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Posted by Rob at 12:39 PM | 2 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Visio Mac?

Every once in a while I get a hit from someone at Microsoft looking for Visio for the Macintosh related material. They typically land on something I wrote back in 2004 where I mention we once had Visio running natively on the Macintosh. It has a nice splash screen created by Chris Roth, but unfortunately I don't have a screen shot of the actual product. It really did exist, it just never saw the light of day. We also had it running natively on a DEC Alpha and on PowerPC versions of NT, but those both died on the vine as well.

I'd still love to see Visio running on a Mac. If Microsoft ever goes about doing that I'd love to work on it, hint, hint. Smile, life is good!

They don't need me to make that happen of course, but it would be an awesome application to have on the Mac.

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Posted by Rob at 8:44 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Switching to the Mac

David Alison: "I was quickly able to get the Mac Pro up and running with Windows XP and my development environment in a VMware Fusion instance. With a couple of minor exceptions it worked great, providing me with everything I needed to build my web based solutions just as I had been on my native Windows XP machine." - I must admit, I don't have the slightest clue who this guy is, but apparently a lot of people do so he's a pretty popular link. Anywho, I digress. I love my Mac, I won't go back to Windows, period. It's my biggest desire to write Mac software full time, but I make a living writing software for Windows and Linux. I do however use my MacBook Pro as a portal to development on both platforms. VMWare Fusion is a wonderful piece of software and allows me to run both OS's and easily switch between them. I have only one complaint, it's small, and I know it's not easy to do. I would love to be able to get full hardware acceleration on the GPU. I know, minor to most, especially Mr. Alison who does web services, but it is kind of major to me as we do live streaming of video and this Mac hardware screams! I've seen folks on our team boot into native Windows, using BootCamp, and get awesome video performance. I just wish we could get it under VMWare.

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Posted by Rob at 8:55 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Strange behavior, a fix

Watch out! It's a blog fly!I've figured out my problem from last night, so I thought I'd share with everybody, just in case you run across it.

First off here's my configuration, it plays heavily into the problem.

1) MacBook Pro
2) VMWare Fusion
3) Windows XP, running in VM
4) Shared fold on Mac for source code
5) Visual Studio 2008
6) Trolltech Qt

The big cluprit, the shared folder on the Mac. For some strange reason Visual Studio will lose its' brain after a while and can no longer write to .IDB/.PDB files on the HPFS volume. There's a lot going on in there, so it could be anything causing the problem. Anywho, to fix my problem I made sure all intermediate and binary files are being written to my XP volume, not the shared drive. It was easy to fix because we use environment variables to direct Visual Studio to the root of our codebases and where to write intermediate and finished binary files, there was one little problem. We auto generate our Visual Studio project files using a program, from Trolltech, called qmake. It's part of Qt, and is quite handy, but in this case it requires a small 'fix' to get around this problem.

By default qmake sets C/C++ > Output Files > Program Database File Name to '.', which in my case would write the .IDB/.PDB files to the shared Mac volume, which causes the strange behavior. No worries! We have the source code to qmake, so you need to make the following change to 'fix' this problem.

Open the file msvc_vcproj.cpp from \Qt\4.4.0\qmake\generators\win32, in the method initCompilerTool(), line 988 in Qt 4.4.0.

Change this...
conf.compiler.ProgramDataBaseFileName = ".\\" ;
To this...
conf.compiler.ProgramDataBaseFileName = placement;
Rebuild qmake, and run qmake over your project files. That should help.

The real fix is this, do not build to your shared Mac drive, there's some sort of caching/permissions problem with it.

Oh, here's the original problem.
fatal error C1090: PDB API call failed, error code '23' : '(
And all you Open Source zealots, please don't point out we have the code. We paid for it, and if they were shipping a binary only version they wouldn't have hard coded these settings. They would've been configurable, so I wouldn't have had to touch the code.

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Posted by Rob at 12:49 PM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Something to appreciate

Brent Simmons: "I hope it’s self-evident that apps with too much stuff are, in general, bad. And that there are some features whose time has come and gone, and there are features that don’t get used much." - This is something I've come to appreciate about my Mac experience. The applications I use on a daily basis have minimal user interface. Two such examples are NetNewsWire and MarsEdit, I love 'em and wouldn't give them up.

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Posted by Rob at 7:44 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Going all Mac

9to5Mac: "Axel Springer (no relation to Axel Rose) is doing what no company of its size has ever done. It plans to move its 12,000 desktops to nearly 100% Mac. Besides the GooglePlex which is a mix of Macs, Windows and Linux and Apple itself, Axel Springer will become the biggest Mac shop in the world." - This could be fairly easy for a lot of shops, go buy everybody Mac Mini's for starters. You can use the keyboard, monitor, and mouse you already own.

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Posted by Rob at 9:29 AM | 1 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

DVD and Books Collection

I was looking for a particular title in our pile of DVD's last night, they're in a few places, and couldn't find what I was looking for. Then I though "Hey, maybe we don't actually have this film?" I can't be sure, but I'm pretty sure we don't. Bummer, I really wanted to watch it again.

Anywho, I thought to myself "Wouldn't it be nice to have a piece of software to organize this stuff? One with barcode support and automagic lookup."

There is such a beast, it's called Librarian Pro. Time to buy some software, and a barcode scanner.

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Posted by Rob at 10:55 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

New Mac Indy Podcast

Daniel Jalkut: "I’m happy to announce a new podcast which you’ll hopefully consider adding to your iTunes subscription lineup: Core Intuition." - Subscribed.

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Posted by Rob at 4:52 PM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Video intro to Cocoa

The Unofficial Apple Weblog: "Over at Theocacao Scott Stevenson has posted the video of his Introduction to Cocoa talk (entitled "Best of Both Worlds") aimed at those who want to learn a bit about Apple's preferred API for building OS X applications." - For later.

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Posted by Rob at 4:21 PM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

More scripting thoughts

I woke up thinking about this, it's weird how my brain does that.

Anywho, here's what I want to do in MarsEdit when I publish a new post to my weblog, maybe some AppleScript junkie can help me out.

1) Fire a script.
2) That script should receive the post Title and URL.
3) I'd like to make a shortened title via TinyURL.
4) Send the title along with the TinyURL to Twitter.

So, has anyone done that? As far as I can tell there's no eventing support in AppleScript, I'm a newbie so I may have missed it. Maybe if I get some time tonight I'll look into doing the script minus the eventing. I think all the other things can be accomplished.

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Posted by Rob at 9:34 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Random Cocoa Links

Cocoa Is My Girlfriend: "...in this post I am going to demonstrate a few things that can be done with NSError objects that have been received. Specifically, how to add options to an NSError and how to (hopefully) recover from one."

Theocacao: "The third edition of Aaron Hillegass's Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X is now shipping. I talked about it in some detail previously, but the summary is that this is one book I can easily recommend to new Mac programmers."

Both via Brent Simmons.

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Posted by Rob at 11:20 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Random Cocoa Links

Cocoa Is My Girlfriend: "...in this post I am going to demonstrate a few things that can be done with NSError objects that have been received. Specifically, how to add options to an NSError and how to (hopefully) recover from one."

Theocacao: "The third edition of Aaron Hillegass's Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X is now shipping. I talked about it in some detail previously, but the summary is that this is one book I can easily recommend to new Mac programmers."

Both via Brent Simmons.

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Posted by Rob at 11:20 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Random Cocoa Links

Cocoa Is My Girlfriend: "...in this post I am going to demonstrate a few things that can be done with NSError objects that have been received. Specifically, how to add options to an NSError and how to (hopefully) recover from one."

Theocacao: "The third edition of Aaron Hillegass's Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X is now shipping. I talked about it in some detail previously, but the summary is that this is one book I can easily recommend to new Mac programmers."

Both via Brent Simmons.

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Posted by Rob at 11:17 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Well, of course they did.

MacWorld UK: "Apple holds two-thirds of the retail market for computers costing $1,000 or more, NPD figures claim." - That's because the only Apple box that sells for less than $1000.00 is the Mac Mini. Duh!

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Posted by Rob at 9:21 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

iPhone experimentation continues

I've been exploring the iPhone SDK lately, it's been fun. I've finally figured some stuff out so it's really starting to get exciting. My "big" hurdle had been understanding how to take advantage of Interface Builder. I finally figured out how to hookup events now that seems pretty obvious, I knew that would happen, light bulb on, bing!

Here's a question for any Mac developers. Do people actually use the Interface Builder to design visually and hookup events, or do they draw the interface and hookup events in code, or do they build the UI all in code? I know, it's a strange question, and I'm sure I'll get a strange mix of answers, if any at all, but I had to ask. I'd love for Daniel Jalkut, or Brent Simmons to chime in.

Doing Windows C/C++ stuff for years had led to a certain expectation with Mac tools. In Windows I only used the graphical tools to create dialogs (at Visio we didn't even do that), then I'd go hook up event handlers in code. It was very straight forward and after using Interface Builder once I can see how easy it would be to hookup events in code instead of letting Interface Builder generate code for me.

I was very happy to discover a hunk of old C++ code compiled and worked like a charm when mixed with Objective-C. It was a pharmacokinetics library my brother and I created a long time back, and it just built and worked. That is a HUGE leg up for me. I can use my bad habit of writing C++ and slowly move into Objective-C. Very nice.

Next hurdle, gaining a better understanding of Objective-C.

It sure would be nice to build a Cocoa version of the Endura WS5000 software, hint, hint.

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Posted by Rob at 9:12 AM | 4 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Low cost Mac vector apps

The Unofficial Apple Weblog: "Today, I'm going to review four leaner, lower-cost (or free) options from four high-powered indie Mac developers: DrawBerry, EazyDraw, Lineform, and VectorDesigner." - I like reviews like this. They used a "real world" example to evaluate each application. Nice.

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Posted by Rob at 8:28 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Win32 to Cocoa

ars technica: "This is the second part of a three-part series describing how one developer became disillusioned with the Windows platform and was reinvigorated by the bright lights of Mac OS X." - Stash for later, I'm having a bear of a time getting used to "The Cocoa Way." Anything that'll help make that transition, I'm all for it. Currently my biggest problem is figuring out how to use Interface Builder and hooking up events so my code actually receives them. This is the most difficult platform change I've ever made. I've worked with a bunch of different platforms and frameworks and I've never struggled this much. Eventually the light bulb will go on and I'll be fine, for now I'm very frustrated with the entire exercise. Objective-C is pretty interesting and I'm sure will pose some problems for me, but I can only burn one bridge at a time, and that bridge is the Interface Builder bridge. More to come.

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Posted by Rob at 9:50 AM | 2 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

I really, really, want to go to this

Apple.com: "The groundbreaking innovations of Mac OS X Leopard and iPhone OS offer two revolutionary development platforms for developers and IT professionals. The Apple Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) is the only place you can receive technical information on these sophisticated platforms from the engineers who created them. Bring your code to the labs and work one-to-one with Apple engineers, applying development methods and best-practices you gain from sessions to enhance your application."

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Posted by Rob at 9:48 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Learning Objective-C

Tiggers are wonderful things!Cocoa Dev Central: "Objective-C is the primary language used to write Mac software. If you're comfortable with basic object-oriented concepts and the C language, Objective-C will make a lot of sense. If you don't know C, you should read the C Tutorial first." - Very nice, easy to follow, tutorial for the beginning Objective-C developer, like your truly.

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Posted by Rob at 5:25 PM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Yes, it's that important

Gizmodo: "The meeting ended with Jobs and Razlaff, now a creative at Frog Design, figuring out how to fix the UI issues, and Jobs asked for the mockups to be made into prototypes. Three weeks later Jobs dropped a compliment on the man." - I've run into folks that don't understand how important the User Interface really is, yes, they actually do exist. The User Interface is the User Experience is the Application. Yeah, you can have really cool algorithms under the hood but if the UI to those algorithms stinks the user won't use the application. Folks will actually live with speed issues as long as their work life is improved.

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Posted by Rob at 5:44 PM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Indy Mac Developer Links

The Indy Mac Developer scene is amazing. Here are a couple more shops hacking away to bring you great Macintosh applications. Enjoy.

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Posted by Rob at 9:39 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Mixing Objective-C and C++

A couple of weeks back I linked to John Nack's discussion of the 64-bit port of Photoshop, it's not a trivial task, but I'd forgotten you can mix C++ and Objective-C. This will make it easier for the Adobe crew to port Photoshop, but it's still going to be one heckuva chore!

Here's a VERY simple example. The Objective-C file, main in this case, is using the C++ class named CPPClass. Please note I had to rename the main.m file to main.mm so the compiler would treat it properly. I've also heard you can name the file '.M', or find a specific compiler setting that'll do the same trick for you. I don't know what that setting is, sorry.

Anywho, here's the simple sample.
#import 
#import "cppclass.h"

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
CPPClass* c = new CPPClass();
c->Method1(99);
c->Method2("Rob was here");
delete c;

return NSApplicationMain(argc, (const char **) argv);
}

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Posted by Rob at 9:19 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Keynote vs. PowerPoint

Macworld: "PowerPoint has caught up to Keynote in many areas and surpassed it in some. But Keynote’s workflow and overall feature set remain superior. Practically speaking, your choice of software probably depends more on the hardware you’ll be using to deliver your presentation (and the software installed on it) than on the features of your authoring program. For that reason, unless Apple releases a Keynote player application for Windows, which isn’t likely, PowerPoint may be a more sensible choice for many speakers." - Interesting wrap up. It looks like Apple has done a great job, as usual, of catching up to the leader, Microsoft in turn has responded. The idea of a Keynote player for Windows isn't such a bad idea, do one for Linux as well to cover all your bases.

The bottom line: Keynote 4.5 mice, PowerPoint 4 mice.

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Posted by Rob at 7:56 AM | 1 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

64-bit Photoshop

Duct Tape, fixer of all things!John Nack: "At the WWDC show last June, however, Adobe & other developers learned that Apple had decided to stop their Carbon 64 efforts. This means that 64-bit Mac apps need to be written to use Cocoa (as Lightroom is) instead of Carbon. This means that we'll need to rewrite large parts of Photoshop and its plug-ins (potentially affecting over a million lines of code) to move it from Carbon to Cocoa." - This is a mammoth undertaking, and quite frankly, I'm not so sure it'll be worth it in the end. It's very rare for a team to sit down, rewrite a gigantor application, and succeed. Why? Think about it for a few minutes. You have a VERY successful product, millions of users worldwide. Those users expect a certain amount of continued support for the product, meaning new features, bug-fixes, etc... So, how do you split your team to deal with that effectively? Now, Adobe may already do that to a certain degree. Two teams, one working on this release, one already exploring and working on the next, then they switch positions, but what about the talk of going from being a Carbon application to a Cocoa application? These are different frameworks, written in two completely different languages. Adobe has a couple of choices here, as I see it, and probable a few I haven't considered. One, they can essentially write their own version of Carbon accounting for just the Carbon features they need, two, they can keep a portable core and write a new Cocoa front end around it. Either way, it's going to be a ton of work. The selfish, techie, side of me says "Yeah, do it, it would be awesome to work on this sort of problem. Go for it!" The reasonable side of me says "Will you sell enough 64-bit native bits to justify the cost? In the end it'll be a business decision and someone will figure out the technical hurdles, that's the way things work in the engineering world. The Sales and Marketing types always ask "Can you do this?" The answer is "Of course we can silly Sales and Marketing people, how much time and money do you have?"

I'm a bit jealous. Whoever works on this is going to have a lot of fun.

UPDATE: John notes the whole Cocoa vs. Carbon debate toward the bottom of the article. If Carbon is good enough for Apple to use in iTunes, it's good enough for anyone else, don't you think?

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Posted by Rob at 10:48 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Hey Microsoft

The Unofficial Apple Weblog: "Throughout the years, Mac OS X has definitely seen its share of changes. In these 7 years, OS X has been through 6 versions (7 if you include the first public beta version)." - Microsoft should consider releasing an update, not labeled as a Service Pack, every year. Something that improves on the Vista experience, be that performance, or a nice subtle UI improvement. It might make people feel a bit better about Vista given it hasn't been well received.

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Posted by Rob at 1:43 PM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Very unique Mac

MAKE Magazine: "MAKE chum Jake von Slatt points us to a beautiful remake of his steampunk Mac Mini workstation by Dave Veloz, who made it for his fiance, no less!" - Very nice.

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Posted by Rob at 12:49 PM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Mac running Windows

The Unofficial Apple Weblog: "Actually, let's not do this. Let's realize that Microsoft is a company and Apple is a company, and while yes, in some fields they are competitors, let's just put the whole Apple vs. PC idea to bed. Guess what: a Mac actually is a PC. It's a very, very well-made PC (in fact, the best made, in this blog's humble opinion)." - Yes, the Macintosh is a great Windows box. Just check out the hardware, who wouldn't want that kind of power behind Windows? And, yes, I'm fairly certain the Linux crowd would be happy with a Mac as well, but I wouldn't want to do that to my Mac, it would be like putting a pig on lipstick. You read that right "Putting a pig(Linux) on lipstick(Mac)."

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Posted by Rob at 9:28 AM | 2 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Leopard floating clock

I like to display, or float, the analog clock on my desktop, call me strange, but it would appear that Apple has removed that as an option from Leopard.

I for one would like it back.

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Posted by Rob at 11:55 AM | 1 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Leopard upgrade issue, not an OS problem

So I finally took the plunge and upgraded to Leopard, it went smooth as silk, until I got home and wanted to connect to our wireless network and it failed with "Connection Timed Out." Sigh...

I have a Westell VersaLink 327W DSL "modem" here at the house and that was the cause of the problem, I needed a firmware upgrade.

Following post #12 on this Mac Rumors forum post fixed my problem.

Good luck to you!

Here's a link to the VersaLink firmware upgrade.

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Posted by Rob at 11:40 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Photoshop history

John Nack: "On this date in 1990, the first version of Photoshop shipped to the world; exactly five years ago we saw the debut of Photoshop's Camera Raw plug-in; and one year ago today, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 1.0 made its official bow." - This was a big day in Adobe's history, on many fronts. Worth a read.

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Posted by Rob at 9:17 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Coda, never heard of it?

Coda: "text editor + transmit + css editor + terminal + books + more = whoah. introducing coda. grow beautiful code." - This looks like a very spiffy web development tool. One for future consideration.

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Posted by Rob at 10:45 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

New Mac Indy Developers

Daniel Jalkut: "Something is changing. In the past few years, more and more of my developer friends have started talking about “going indie.” That is, going out on their own to develop, market, support, and profit from their own software. Many years ago, while I was working at Apple, the notion of striking out on one’s own was not even on the table for most developers I knew." - Expect to see more great Mac software on the horizon. I'm green with envy.

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Posted by Rob at 11:26 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Upgrading to Leopard

I think we've all heard a story or two about Leopard upgrade issues. Here's what I've been told. If you're using apps like Shimo, or Growl, uninstall them before upgrading. Apparently they've been a source of upgrade issues. Other than that the folks I work with have had zero issues.

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Posted by Rob at 10:14 AM | 1 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

There's plenty of room Nick

A wreathed gas lamp in the snow.Nick Bradbury: "Oh, and I've been infected, too: I'm seriously thinking about buying a Mac Pro after FeedDemon 2.6 is released. Whether I'll develop anything for the Mac remains to be seen, but I have to admit I'd like to escape the DLL and device driver hell of Windows for a while." - I've been a Windows developer since 1992, I've been doing Linux stuff since 2005, and I'd love nothing more than to develop Mac software. Windows is nice, Linux is arcane, but the Mac is over the top elegant. I only wish I could find myself a nice little niche to fill with a Mac client application. That said, come on in Nick, the water's fine!

Maybe someday, when I grow up, I'll be a Mac developer.

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Posted by Rob at 5:20 PM | 2 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Why I hate instant messengers

The Adium DuckieSince being called Old School the other day I decided to fire up an instant messenger so I could be available for co-workers. I chose to use Adium, apparently it's widely used. So, on to why I hate these sinister pieces of software. They're a BIG distraction! Flashing windows catch my attention. That being said is there any way to create Groups in Adium and set your online status to Invisible or Offline for the entire group? I only want my co-workers to know I'm online.

Thanks.

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Posted by Rob at 8:50 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Hog Bay

Jesse Grosjean: "That reaction is certainly not representative, in fact it's the only such comment that I've seen. But in the interest of full discloser, and because I think it might be fun for some people to read, I've decided to fully document everything that I can remember about TaskPaper's launch, and tell you what I think helped make it a success." - An Indy Mac developer talks his latest creation, TaskPaper.

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Posted by Rob at 11:16 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Mac Santa?

Merry Macmas!
That's right, it's time to visit MacSanta!

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Posted by Rob at 11:03 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

The Mac is now a target

UNIXReed Me: "After all the Mac v. PC commercials, I will laugh my considerable posterior off if Apple winds up creating a UAC-style prompt to warn their customers that an application is attempting to access critical system components..." - It was inevitable. The kiddies can't resist being destructive. I'm fairly certain they'll come up with an elegant solution, but who knows.

There is one point that's not correct in the post however, Linux does not live inside Mac OS X. It's a Mach Kernel + BSD, which is very, very different than Linux. Inside they call it Darwin, also called XNU.

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Posted by Rob at 9:59 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Software, Beer, and Mac

Steve Mitchell: "My parents bought me my first computer in 1984. It was the original 128K Macintosh. According to the sales guy, they'd already sold out of their first shipment, and more were back ordered. So I had to spend an agonizing six weeks waiting for my computer." - Great story Steve, and welcome back to Mac.

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Posted by Rob at 9:36 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

To upgrade, or not to upgrade

I haven't upgraded to Leopard yet. There, I said it. I think most folks at work have and I've heard mixed results. My office mate had some minor issues and had trouble with X after installing.

So the question is, should I wait or should I install now?

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Posted by Rob at 7:25 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Mac coding headstart

Apple.com: "Complete with introductory video, lesson guide and sample code in an Xcode project, you'll learn to create new and compelling features in your application using the development languages, APIs and frameworks of Mac OS X Leopard."

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Posted by Rob at 7:13 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Vista help?

Cass McNutt: "Given that last caveat, I've been thinking about either moving in more fully to Vista, or downgrading to Windows XP altogether. If I knew it could be clean, it would be an absolute no-brainer: I'd punt Vista in a heartbeat, because XP just works, and that's all I really want the darned thing to do. I'm obviously not alone in this." - Another possible downgrade to Windows XP in the works. Also, Cass, I can see how you're underwhelmed with your Mac G4 experience, the Intel Macs are amazing. In fact, they're also the best hardware to run Vista on.

Like I said in your earlier post. I don't give up a thing to run XP and Ubuntu in VMWare Fusion. I've been able to do everything I want to do, so you don't have to give up those Windows apps you rely on daily. Of course you need to do what's right for you and a lot of Windows folks have a sort of culture shock when they move into the Mac world. Yes, it does work differently than your Windows machine, but that the best thing about it.

The hardest thing to get used to, for me, are the keyboard shortcuts. I still do the wrong thing on occasion. Beyond that, it's been an eye opening experience. I won't go back to using Windows daily unless I have to. I will continue to develop Windows applications because it's something I know how to do, but if I could find a Macintosh application to develop that would allow me to make a living I'd be all over it. Yes, the experience has been that good.

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Posted by Rob at 8:52 AM | 3 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Interesting company name

Circus Ponies. Yep, that's right Circus Ponies. With a name like that it must be a Mac shop. Their Notebook software looks seriously handy.

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Posted by Rob at 8:52 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

How to move to a Mac

Apple.com: "Why upgrade to Vista when you can upgrade to Mac? Especially when you can move all your stuff from an old PC to a shiny new Mac in less time than it takes to add the memory, hard disk space, and graphics card you’ll probably need to install Vista. Here are three easy ways to make your move."

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Posted by Rob at 9:59 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

How do you use your Mac?

A typical day with my Mac.

0) Auto start Quicksilver.
1) Start Entourage.
2) Start Safari.
3) Start VMWare Fusion.
4) Start MarsEdit.
5) Start NetNewsWire.
6) Start Terminal.

The interesting one in the list is #3, VMWare Fusion. Why? Well we develop software for Windows and Linux, so I use both OS's on a daily basis, right from within my MacBook. I'll typically start Windows or Linux(Ubuntu) up and when I have need for the other I simply suspend the current session, minimize it, and fire up the other OS. This tends to happen when I need to make sure my changes didn't break anything in the other OS, whichever it may be at the time. This works beautifully. So much so I'm still surprised by it just about every day.

I use other apps on occasion, like...

OmniPlan
OmniGraffle
MindJet Mindmanager
Chicken of the VNC
Remote Desktop Connection
TextMate
SmartSVN
XCode
Dashboard
Shimo
Growl (indirectly of course)

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Posted by Rob at 12:33 PM | 6 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Why aren't you running Vista?

The other day the VP of our little software division came into my office while I was building some code, in Windows, I'd just added some functionality to on the Linux side of my universe; making sure I didn't break anything, and he says "I'm surprised you're not running Vista?" to which I replied "I have a Mac, I don't need Vista."

The reply seemed to satisfy him.

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Posted by Rob at 12:23 PM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

I couldn't agree more Chris

Chris Pirillo: "I’m still not so sure I’d recommend the OS (or any Linux distribution) to anybody who considers themselves less than an “average” user. OS X has geeky underpinnings (in UNIX), but Apple has rightfully gone to great lengths to hide inadvertent access that power.

For Ubuntu to succeed in widespread adoption, it must gain wider hardware support and become a lot less… Linuxy. ;)"
- Ties nicely into what I said yesterday. It looks like he said it a day before I did, but you get what I mean.

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Posted by Rob at 9:03 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Linux for my parents?

A cute little monkey.Foogazi: "The most obvious and important reason your parents should run Linux is the security the Linux operating system provides." - I don't think so folks. The most obvious choice is Macintosh, period. If your parents already have a Windows box and $600.00 they can score a Mac mini and hook it up to their existing monitor, keyboard, and mouse. Apple pays very close attention to the user experience, everything just works. When we bought our daughter a Mac laptop she popped it open and started working day one, without Dad's help. The only reason I knew it had arrived is she called for the wireless password. I've provided ZERO technical support in a year-and-a-half. Try that with a Linux box.

The open source camp should take a close look at the Macintosh user experience and clone that instead of the Windows experience. If people want Linux to be adopted by mom and pop it's going to have to work WITHOUT configuration when the box is started, no matter what the environment. That has been my experience with Mac.

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Posted by Rob at 8:32 AM | 1 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Ubuntu on the Mac

Sven Andersson: "It seems to me that Parallels has concentrated on getting the Windows application to run smoothly and left us Linux users out in the cold. What to do? Let's try VMware Fusion instead." - Excellent tutorial for those of you, like me, using VMWare Fusion and installing Ubuntu.

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Posted by Rob at 4:18 PM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Windows to Mac development

Now I'm using a Macintosh I have a huge desire to write applications for it.

How do you get a C/C++, Win32, COM guy over to writing Objective-C for Cocoa? I may never find the time to do anything but it would be nice to have a set of references if I ever do.

Thank You.

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Posted by Rob at 3:13 PM | 5 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

How to create Apple Dashboard Widgets

For future reference, Developing Dashboard Widgets.

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Posted by Rob at 9:49 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

New weblogging tool

MarsEdit LogoI've been using MarsEdit for the past few days, and I'm loving it. It connected to my Blogger based and WordPress blogs without much effort. I need to figure out how to hook it up to MSN Spaces, but I'm sure that'll be just as easy.

So, if you're using a Mac, and you'd like a client side publishing tool I'd strongly recommend MarsEdit.

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Posted by Rob at 8:31 AM | 2 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Tools for future use

Note to self: Check out Apple's Localization Tools.

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Posted by Rob at 1:24 PM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Windows on a Mac?

James Robertson: "I'm using XP Pro on my MacBook (under parallels), but I might install Vista at some point" - I've been using a Mac for two weeks now, and I love it. While James is using Parallels I decided to use VMWare Fusion to create virtual machines for my development use. I have a complete installation of Windows XP with all my development tools, and a machine running Ubuntu with all my development tools. I'm very pleasantly surprised with the performance, it's very acceptable, and I'm sure I could make it a bit better once I learn how to really use Fusion.

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Posted by Rob at 9:52 AM | 0 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

Oh the Joy!

For the last week I've been loving life on my shiny new 17" MacBook Pro! I haven't posted about it so I could have some quality time with it, you know, let it sink in a while, "get to know me" time.

Will write Mac Code for foodI'm quite hooked, and I can't see going back to using a Windows box on a daily basis any time soon. Of course my job does require writing code for Windows and Linux so I'll have to continue working in those two environments but I'll do it from my Mac. I'm currently using Chicken of the VNC to connect to my Linux box and as I'm typing this post I have VMWare Fusion running Windows XP, on a separate display, installing Visual Studio.NET so I can work on Windows code. As soon as that installation is complete I'll move on to installing Ubuntu or Fedora Core 7 for my Linux develop needs.

Now all I need to do is spend some quality time with XCode, Objective-C and Cocoa.

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Posted by Rob at 11:36 AM | 1 comments | Click here for a permalink to this entry.

About

Rob Fahrni has been a Software Developer for 20 years. He's developed DOS, Windows, Linux, iPhone, and Palm based applications in C, C++, Objective-C/Cocoa, C#/ASP.Net, and, yes, even BASIC...
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CrabApples.NET Home Kim Fahrni, Hacker Widow Haileigh Fahrni, My Culinary Journey Taylor Fahrni, Goin' Buggy Jerry Fahrni, Pharmacy Informatics and Technology

Apple Core Labs, LLC RxCalc - A Pharmacokinetic Calculator for iPhone

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I work at Pelco. The opinions expressed here are my own, and neither Pelco nor any other party necessarily agrees with them.

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